Michael Kim to speak at the AIA’s ‘Edge Living’ event

Join us at the Center for Architecture this coming Monday, April 27, where ARExA Partner Michael Kim will be presenting as part of the AIA’s Edge Living: Micro Units, Live/Work Environments, and the Future of Urban Dwellings.

Presenters include:
Michelle Addington, Hines Professor of Sustainable Architectural Design, Yale School of Architecture
Eric Bunge, AIA, Principal, nARCHITECTS
Michael Kim, AIA, Partner, ARExA
Jinhee Park, AIA, Principal, SsD
Miriam Peterson, Partner, Peterson Rich Office

The event will be moderated by:
Beth Broome, Managing Editor, Architectural Record and
Tomas Rossant, AIA, 2015 AIANY President

This is the fouth in a series of events related to the presidential theme of Tomas Rossant, AIA, “Dialogues from the Edge of Practice.” The theme intends to explore how architects are boldly enlarging the purview of the practitioner to bring their particular critical problem solving skills and design acumen to endeavors previously considered outside the traditional scope of practice. There has never been a time when the role of the architect has been more relevant as an instrument to shape culture, society, and positive environmental outcomes. “Dialogues” will engage the practitioners amongst us who are breaking rules, trying new things, and taking new risks—expanding the impact of the architect—and disseminate their experiences to our professional community.

In order to achieve Mayor de Blasio’s affordable housing goals, architects and City agencies must work together to contain construction costs and time. Through the development of microunits and live/work communities, we can build more units on a single site and support the creative economy in all five boroughs. These approaches could also serve the growing senior population.

Speakers will answer the questions: How should the mix of dwelling typologies in New York City evolve? What would these types of development require from a design perspective? A zoning/policy perspective?

This event was preceded by a think tank roundtable discussion with thought leaders deeply involved with advances in micro units, live/work spaces, and the future of urban dwellings.

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